Wedding Rings


Wedding rings come in a variety of styles and fit a variety of budgets. Typically, the groom is responsible to buy the ring for the bride, and in a 2 ring ceremony, as is common today; the bride would be responsible for obtaining the grooms ring.
There are many couples who will shop for the wedding rings together, because they choose to buy a matching set. No matter how you decide to buy the rings in the end however, you can be sure you will find wedding rings that are within your forecasted budget.


In today’s economy competition is even fiercer than ever. Large jewelry companies are offering even greater discounts to win your business, and if you start your search early enough and find a set you want in 2 different stores, you may be able to leverage an even bigger discount in return for your business.


Wedding rings have an interesting history. It is only recently (since World War II), that the double ring ceremony started to become common. Wedding rings first began being used in Europe, and the tradition quickly spread. Wedding rings are considered to be the last of a series of gifts, with an engagement ring in there as well.



More recently and probably introduced by jewelry makers, was the introduction of the “promise ring”. The promise ring is sort of a prelude to the engagement ring, and is considered one of the pre-marital gifts as well. Wedding rings vary in style from plain gold bands, to diamond encrusted masterpieces. As was previously mentioned, the budget will dictate the style and intricacy of the wedding rings ultimately used.


In a traditional wedding, the best man has charge of the ring during the ceremony, but in a more elaborate wedding, where the wedding party is larger, there will be a ring bearer, who is traditionally a little boy, who can be from either side, and he will carry the ring on a pillow until the minister or priest is ready for it. In some European countries, the wedding ring is the same as the engagement ring, and the status of the ring is changed by engraving on it, and changing the hand on which it is worn.


In law, and most religions for that matter, the marriage ends in death. It is customary however that the surviving spouse continue to wear his or her wedding ring after the spouse has passed on, except that it would be placed on the other hand. Some customs also dictate that the surviving spouse will wear the wedding ring of the deceased as well as his or her own ring. Customs surrounding the wedding rings can and will vary from country to country depending on locality and belief. Another factor that dictates these customs is the custom of the individual family too.


The plain gold band is by far the most popular choice of wedding rings. Women typically wear a narrow band, while the men’s is generally wider.


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